Songs For The Season: Fall Playlist

songs season fall

Autumn may be the most visually rewarding season that nature has gifted us. While all the other seasons are sure to give it a fair fight, there is something about the orange, red, and yellow change in the leaves that gift us new enlightenment and invigoration in the natural world around us.

But what would the striking change in season be without the illumination of sonic assistance? Entering our third playlist for the seasons, UTG is happy to present to you our favorite songs to pair with the crisping air, a nice glass of apple cider, and of course, pumpkin everything.

Open your senses and invite in the changing terra, and be sure to try out these tracks as you earn the rewards gifted by naturalism.


Foreign Tongues – “Luxury”

Although “Luxury” by Boston-based Foreign Tongues has only been out for a little over a month now, it has certainly made its mark on this seasonal transition. The band creates an atmosphere that is simplistic while remaining consistently lush. The vast landscape created lays the foundation for the crooning vocals that emanate sorrow shrouded in a sea of vivid musical textures. The band has yet to release a full-length, and with the release of “Luxury,” I only find myself in a heightened state of anticipation until that moment comes. Let the music through you, and let the vocals guide you, as you traverse through this ever abundantly rewarding season. — Drew Caruso, Staff Writer


Agnes Obel – “Brother Sparrow”

Almost all of Agnes Obel’s gorgeous catalogue feels like the musical equivalent of the Fall season to me. “Brother Sparrow” was the first song of hers I ever heard and remains one of my favorites to this day. Simple acoustic guitar and piano led by Obel’s beautiful vocal delivery serves as the perfect soundtrack for staring out the window, admiring the Earth’s stunning transformation. If I didn’t know any better, I could easily mistake “Brother Sparrow” for a flawless, female-led Elliott Smith cover, and no one does Autumn quite like Elliott (RIP). — Brian Lion, Co-Owner / Editor


A Day To Remember – “City Of Ocala”

I don’t think anyone will ever understand when I say that certain bands to me are “other than summer bands.” I simply mean this: certain genres are just really difficult to listen to in blistering, ninety-degree weather, so I just don’t. It’s so difficult to digest and integrate heavy guitar riffs and gang vocals into your day when the sweat dripping down your forehead isn’t coming from being in the pit; hence my inclination towards EDM during the summertime and towards the likes of A Day to Remember right when the season ends. “City Of Ocala” is ADTR’s most recent full-length’s opening track, and as pop punk cliché as it is, it showcases aggressive-sounding hometown love for good old Florida that’s perfect for those late-night autumn drives on the interstate. — Dana Reandelar, Staff Writer


Transit – “The Answer Comes In Time”

It’s always fun to look forward to a new release from a band you love, but there’s nothing that compares to an artist that comes out of nowhere and surprises you. In 2011, Transit did just that and ushered in the Autumn with their classic Listen & Forgive. Every track is worthy of a drive to the pumpkin patch, but “The Answer Comes In Time” sticks out in the crowd as an instant classic. The fantastic guitar work reminds of a new-wave American Football and the relaxed pace of the track magically matches the slowed-down nature of the Fall season. While Young New England failed to live up to the band’s reputation, we’re looking forward to the band’s upcoming Joyride in hopes that Transit will bounce back and deliver the soundtrack to Fall 2014. — John Bazley, Staff Writer


Thrice – “Image Of The Invisible”

From the pulsating morse code introduction to the urgent vocal refrain of “We are more than carbon and chemicals,” everything about this track screams Autumn to me. From the lyrics which seemingly mirror my headspace at this time of year, through to the way the songs use of light and shade builds a sense of unpredictability that mirrors the ‘four seasons in one day’ weather pattern typical of that time of year, the song is the perfect accompaniment to an autumn day. The fact it marked a transitional moment for the band themselves only adds to its suitability. — Brenton Harris, Resident Australian / Staff Writer


Hostage Calm – “A Thousand Miles Away From Here”

“Hoodie weather” is something held near and dear to the hearts of many, particularly in New York City where the heat is too damn hot and the cold is mighty harsh. Just a few days ago I had my first “hoodie weather” day, walking up the steps of Penn Station to 34th Street while the opening riffs of “A Thousand Miles Away From Here” blared through my headphones. I put on my sunglasses and lit a cigarette, conceivably thinking I was way cooler than I actually am. The liveliest of the tracks off of Hostage Calm’s new album Die On Stage, this song merges love lost and deep-rooted punk energy. My only complaint is that it’s a mere 130 seconds. — Derek Scancarelli, Interviewer / Photographer


The Get Up Kids – “Overdue”

There are just some melodies that spread a seasonal aura. Despite being released with On A Wire in May 2002, “Overdue” by The Get Up Kids is as Fall as a song can get. The reflective vibrance of Matt Pryor’s folklore storytelling mixed with resounding honesty gives the song the perfect soundtrack to shorter days and crisp weather. “Overdue” contains the subtle patience and transparency needed for songs in a Fall playlist. — Matthew Leimkuehler, Music Editor / Feature Writer


Carissa’s Wierd – “September Come Take This Heart Away”

I am spoiled by being from New England, especially in the Fall. As the temperature begins to cool down, and the leaves begin to change, there is nothing better than exploring the history that New England leaves behind. Ranging from the beginning of the United States to the present, New England houses the birth of a nation, and many of the major events instilled during those times. Pairing these adventurous escapes in Boston and its greater area with the somber effects of Carissa’s Wierd, specifically “September Come Take This Heart Away,” only illumines the eeriness of the abandoned houses and water mills strewn about the state. With soft percussion, vocals, and guitars, Carissa’s Wierd make my time in New England that much more moving. — Drew Caruso, Staff Writer


Title Fight – “Leaf”

When I think of Fall, leaves come to mind whether I’m watching them fall slowly to the ground or better yet, raking them. But leaves have always been a part of my life, even making my high school graduation quote in the form of Led Zeppelin’s Ramble On (“Leaves are falling around, it’s time I was on my way”). But in the present, Title Fight is a band that truly gives off as a band that knows how to make songs that can be heard as “Fall” songs. “Leaf” is the perfect example of this characterization and it goes to show that this could be a new season of listening growing by the years. The song has great guitar work especially in the opening riff that it makes your mind perception fall with the tone. Lyrics of loneliness also add to the idea of hibernating whether it’d be back in school or working every day in truly finding yourself. This track can help show that path in becoming “a single leaf in the wind blowing.” — Ryan Kappy, Staff Writer


The Anniversary – “The Heart Is A Lonely Hunter”

It was hard to narrow down a song to contribute, but I feel this one is one that perhaps may be a new one for some of those reading this. Everything about this song strikes me and puts me in the emotional atmosphere typical to the Autumn. The bouncy, upbeat vibe of the keyboard shimmers like the last gleams and remnants of summer warmth at the beginning of the season, with the “quieter/emptier” verses feeling more like the transition to the minor shock of those first chilly days, leaves changing colors and falling. The lyrics seemingly painting the picture of a past love/almost love/perhaps both. The blending of nostalgia and sensuality (“I’ll march slowly and I’ll never forget how the music stopped or the feel of your breath”) with the accompanying “ooooohhhh” backing vocals brings to mind some sort of bittersweet reminiscing walk around town. Fall to me is a transitory season, and this song very much helps convey the searching, backward and forward, that we tend to go through around this time of year. — Desmond Zantua, Vocalist of Bellwether


Dikembe – “Scottie Spliffen”

Winning us all over with its Freaks & Geeks excerpt introduction, short and sweet introductory track, “Scottie Spliffen,” off of Dikembe’s debut EP, Chicago Bowls, is an appropriate back-to-school jam as it lyrically embodies the thoughts of a sixteen-year-old kid trying to get out of class to skateboard to the nearest deli. Here’s to hoping you all find your gigantic drum kit this school year. -– Dana Reandelar, Staff Writer


Bright Eyes – “Lua”

This could just have easily have been the whole of I’m Wide Awake It’s Morning for me, however, if I have to choose one song, then “Lua” it is. One of the most hauntingly beautiful and honest songs ever written about the male perspective on a one night stand, the gentle acoustic instrumentation blends perfectly with Oberst’s desperate delivery and self-effacing lyrics to create the perfect accompaniment to a 7 a.m. walk home from a stranger’s place. It is a gorgeous song, made for those Autumn days when the gentle drizzle stops long enough for the morning song to break through the clouds and you find yourself ruminating on the meaning or the meaninglessness of the night before, and often, of it all. — Brenton Harris, Resident Australian / Staff Writer


The Early November – “Ever So Sweet”

It’s almost that time of year again — when the leaves crunch beneath your feet and Ace Enders’ falsetto creeps up your spine and warms your body like no pumpkin-flavored product could dream of doing. The amount of swaying, acoustic, and emotional songs produced by this band are positively endless, so let’s take the safe bet with “Ever So Sweet.” The four-minute number is chilling and reflective, a perfect fit for the season. — Matthew Leimkuehler, Music Editor / Feature Writer


Ben Howard – “Everything”

When the temperature starts to drop, I always find myself particularly nostalgic for the past, with the falling leaves acting as a beautiful reminder that nothing is permanent. Ben Howard’s “Everything” is an equally stunning cue, built around ebbing acoustic licks and wispy vocal lines. Throughout, the ridiculously underrated singer-songwriter reflects on his distant past, eventually realizing that “everything must start again anew,” regardless of how comfortable we’ve become living in our memories. As Howard shows, this cycle is as inevitable as the changing seasons, and we are far better off throwing on a hoodie and embracing the cold rather than running away from it. — Kyle Florence, Staff Writer


Mark Snow – The X-Files Theme

Before the thoughts of changing leaves and cooler weather, my mind immediately lands on Halloween come Autumn. Therefore, when being challenged with choosing music to coincide with the new season, John Carpenter’s iconic theme to Halloween obviously came to mind, but for me, it’s Mark Snow’s theme to the greatest TV show ever that really fucked up my dreams and sleep patterns as a child. The X-Files theme is not only instantly recognizable, but it’s still creepy as shit today and accentuates ominous October nights with ease. — Brian Lion, Co-Owner / Editor


Tigers Jaw – “Carry You Over”

I’ve always felt like emo and Autumn went hand in hand. Tigers Jaw is a very cool breeze, falling leaves band. Almost any track off of Charmer could certainly apply here but I’ve decided to go with their contribution to Will Yip’s Off The Board comp, “Carry You Over.” It’s the type of jam that I could listen to on a hoodie-clad stroll, kicking great big piles of leaves as I contemplate life and all its mysteries that have me lost within my own head. This song resonates with me and it meshes well with the best season of the year. — Brian Lion, Co-Owner / Editor

Drew Caruso

Drew Caruso is a Bostonian who, when not writing about music and film, spends his time getting lost in New England, reading books, talking about science whether people want to listen or not, and more. To see the thoughts of a scientist by day and a writer by night, follow him on Twitter.
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