EDITORIAL: The Cure to Growing Older – A Musical Retrospective

The Cure To Growing Older Featured Image

When I was in the 6th grade, things were far simpler than they are now. These things were undemanding in most respects, but growing more socially complicated by the day. Middle school was that time in my life when girls became attractive, attitudes changed, friends changed, and growing up truly began. I recognize the growth that began in junior high as a part of who I am. In conjunction with my social growth, came my newfound hunger for music.

 

I found the cure to growing older and you’re the only place that feels like home…

 

In my youth, I was heavily guarded by my parents in most aspects of life. I was a Boy Scout and church-going boy with straight A’s and soccer as an interest. I was a good kid. The kind my mother was proud of. I didn’t swear or get into trouble, I had good friends and made responsible decisions. My internet access was limited by dial-up, AOL child-locks, and previously determined web-browsing time. Middle School was pretty normal for me until something new came along. That thing was Chicago based, pop-punk band Fall Out Boy and they were not allowed. My first illegally burned album was Fall Out Boy’s From Under the Cork Tree and when I received my copy, I learned a few things.

 

I’ll be your best kept secret and your biggest mistake…

 

The first was that my friend Josh could not properly operate Windows Media Player. My copy of FUCT was missing track 1. For those who have heard “Our Lawyer Made Us Change the Name of This Song So We Wouldn’t Get Sued,” I’d appreciate if you didn’t play it for me when I’m riding in your car at high speeds or locked in a bomb shelter with you. It isn’t that I don’t like that song. In all likelihood, I’ve probably heard it. Upon hearing my tale, people have offered to send me the track to complete the CD. That’s, of course, very nice of them but you see, From Under the Cork Tree is still a very special album to me and my copy is complete as far as I’m concerned. Adding that unknown song to the beginning of it would ruin the feeling that I still get from hearing the first guitar rip on “Of All the Gin Joints in All the World.” My From Under the Cork Tree is only 12 songs long and that is how it will stay.

 

You only hold me up like this ’cause you don’t know who I really am…

 

The second thing I learned was that my mother is not a fan of obscure lyrics referring to sex and blasphemy. I recall a car ride with my mother that featured me sitting in the back seat (like I said, I was guarded) with my portable CD player spinning my incomplete copy of FUCT quite loudly. It was early summertime. During a pause in-between tracks (again, Josh sucked at Windows Media Player) I heard my mom cycling through radio stations as she usually does. Upon hearing a snippet of “Sugar We’re Going Down,” I immediately paused my disc and told my mother to go back to that song. Yes, I paused the CD that song was on to hear it on the radio. Back then, hearing a band you know about was exciting, not depressing. After years of listening to bands my parent’s knew that I didn’t on national radio, I finally had one on them! My mom went back to the station (Q 104.1 for any Akron/Cleveland area readers) and listened along as I watched her face in anticipation. Perhaps I hoped she’d like it and take me to a concert, or maybe I wanted her to know I was listening to something a bit more risqué than pop-country or Jason Mraz. Regardless, she listened, the song changed, and I went back to my CD.

 

I know this hurts, it was meant to (it was meant to). Your secret’s out and the best part is it isn’t even a good one and it’s mind over you don’t, don’t matter…

 

Upon returning home that night, My mom called me into the dining room where the computer cabinet was contained. Curious, I answered her call to find her looking at the lyric sheet for “Sugar, We’re Going Down.” This is when she asked me, “Jake, what do these lyrics mean?” I was 12, I had no clue. They were catchy and the music video had a deer-boy in it. That was enough for me. Hell, I thought Patrick Stump was british for a full year and that the singer always wrote the songs. I was in ignorant bliss. My answer didn’t appease my mother who had a concerned and irritated look on her face. This face remained as she told me, “I don’t want you to listen to this band anymore.” Luckily, my mom wasn’t aware that I had my coveted burned CD, so I continued my listening in secret. The songs were even better than before. Why? Well, that’s because I wasn’t supposed to have them of course. The “forbidden fruit” effect was placed on pop-punk music and thus, my departure from good boy Jake began.

 

Are we growing up, or just going down? It’s just a matter of time until we’re all found out. Take our tears, put ’em on ice, ’cause I swear I’d burn the city down to show you the lights…

 

I’ll admit that FOB was not my first banned artist. Rap was an absolute no-go in the Tender household and my friend Jimmy was a big Eminem fan. I listened to Slim Shady’s music every time I was there while playing Duke Nukem, Grand Theft Auto, and a plethora of other blood-filled first person shooters. The difference here is that I was listening ONLY because I wasn’t allowed. Rap wasn’t my thing. Granted, everyone has a rap phase, but the semi-censored Curtain Call never stood up to the lasting influence Cork Tree had.

 

They call kids like us vicious and carved out of stone. But for what we’ve become, we just feel more alone…

 

From Under the Cork Tree was the first CD I listened to on repeat for days, months even. It was the first album for which I memorized all the lyrics, inflections, and harmonies. Fall Out Boy was the first band I learned all of the members names for. Patrick Stump was my “favorite singer” for at least 2 years. I joined AIM chat rooms and sought out others who listened to FOB. I didn’t like those pretentious assholes who didn’t like anything after Take This To Your Grave. I now recognize that I’m one of those assholes, but I still fume when some of my favorite records are so easily discredited by ignorant semi-listeners.

 

I’m the first kid to write of hearts, lies, and friends, and I am sorry my conscience called in sick again, and I’ve got arrogance down to a science. Oh, and I’m the first kid to write of hearts, lies, and friends…

 

From Under The Cork Tree transformed me from book-worm to music-nerd. I began to seek out related and unrelated music and bands. My library grew, my media player changed (WMP, MusicMatch Jukebox, and finally Winamp), and my focuses changed. From this album on, my conversation starters turned to be band/song based, my friendships started revolving around similar musical tastes, and my music library’s correctness took precedence over my homework’s. Without Fall Out Boy’s influence in middle school, I would have never taken that leap into alternative music and my favorite artists today may have never found their way into my ear canals, I would most definitely not be writing this or any other music-realated article or review. From Under the Cork Tree is one album I will always cherish and it’s due credit. After all, without it, you’d have never read this.

 

Written by Jacob Tender (follow him on Twitter)

Jacob Tender

Jacob is a freelance writer who calls curbside.audio home. He is also the co-host of the Bantha Fodder podcast and helps UTG with technical and financial nonsense.
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  • This is a great story.  We all have the band that did it for us.  I guess Green Day’s Dookie was my album, and I had it on cassette, which means I’m several years older than you.  I’m the same age as Patrick.  I was so upset to see what he’d written on his website recently after reading this article.  I hope he knows that a lot of us love his current music, not just TTTYG and FUCT.

  • Jon

    After reading this, the first thing I did was ctrl F “dude” because I knew dude ranch had to be a response.  Same case for me, it’s funny you bring up the missing track thing, my copy of dude ranch was taped over a freaking new kids on the block cassette and apple shampoo was cut off after about 15 seconds so when I first heard it on cd it kind of blew my mind.  Never a big FOB fan (or hater) but your experience sounds nearly identical to mine, great article man.

  • Thanks man!

  • Laura

    Great article, brought such a rush of nostalgia. FUCT was the first Fall Out Boy album I heard, and the first album I memorized all the lyrics to too. I think it was the first time I became “obsessed” with a band’s music. I can see why Patrick decided to share this article on his blog.

  • Lee

    Like many, the first song from FOB I had ever heard was “Sugar”. I remember it so clearly it pains me. I was 12 years old and it was in the early summer. I at my grandmother’s house; she had left for work, so I had called a friend of mine who lived a few hours away. I was talking to her, when suddenly I heard Patrick’s voice on the tv, which had, before then, only been background noise. I dropped the phone and stared at the television. My heart, honest to goodness, leapt.  I knew, at that moment, that I really had found something special, and furthermore, (it felt like) something something all for me. Later that summer, I bought my first Fall Out Boy album- I actually picked up TTTYG first, because I wanted to start where they had started (I didn’t learn about Evening Out with Your Girlfriend until a year and a half later). I loved it. It brought me to tears and comforted something in me that, to this day, I cannot explain. I love FOB. I have every album and the first (and last…so far, I hope) time I ever saw them live still is one of the most wonderful moments of my life, so far- the night of my Middle School graduation. This all sounds very emotional, I know- but, it was all just to say that I think Patrick Stump is an incredible artist. He is absolutely stunning. No matter what he is playing (solo, with FOB, or otherwise), no matter his weight, how his hair looks, what his style is- none of it matters. He remains refreshingly talented. None of that shallow nonsense will change that. I am a fan of FOB. I plan on staying a fan of FOB. They have a definite place in my heart. I am a fan of Patrick Stump. I plan on staying a fan of Patrick Stump. He has a definite place in my heart. I am now an undergrad at school in Europe and in my apartment, there is a Folie a Deux poster-and I wear the t-shirt to class, regardless of the flack I may occasionally get for it. I play Soul Punk in my room. It’s quality art and i enjoy it. And so it goes. Patrick Stump has changed a multitude of lives for the better and that’s that, folks. 
    I honestly hope that whatever Patrick’s decision may be, that it first and foremost, makes him happy. But do not, under any circumstance, let the haters get you down, Patrick. 
    please don’t.

  • Samandandrew2003

    I’m sure your musings on From Under the Cork Tree strike a chord with any music lover, not necessarily because of the content but because we all have that pivotal album or band that transformed our taste in music or ignited it in the first place.  For me that band was the Stone Roses which shows my age I guess!

    However Patrick Stump as a solo artist and Fall Out Boy as band have an equally resonant role within my heart due to their music and I can honestly saw that the response Patrick put on his blog in response to reading your article brought tears to my eyes. 

    OK some people won’t like what he’s done or may do; fine that’s called
    taste, each to his own, opinions are only that but thanks to the internet and its pernicious influence on modern culture where we can hide anonymously behind throwaway remarks, justifying being nasty with the defence we have free speech without taking responsibility for how these tweets, replies and so on could impact on someone else.  To think he feels so disenchanted and knocked by negative criticism to
    the point of not wishing to perform again because of people not
    ‘allowing’ him to move on is tragic.
         
    I applaud Patrick for being so candid and it only increases the respect I have for him as a person which was already tremendous for his talent, intelligence, humility and sincerity.  I had the privilege to see him on one of the two dates he played England and I was blown away just to hear that voice of his live.  His solo album and Folie are among my personal favourites and really should have received a lot more recognition for the quality of the songwriting at their heart.  Sadly that’s something that probably will only happen long after he has given up all hope in continuing with his musical career.

  • Real Fan

    Whaaaa? That band sucked after Take This To Your Grave, you’re crazy man

  • Tim8391

    Ok, look, I wanna say this. I personally liked Patrick Stump’s solo album, and I don’t care what anyone thinks, I think he did a great job making it. Besides, I heard that the same has happened to other bands as well. One example is Night Shades by Cobra Starship. Most fans don’t like that album because it doesn’t have that pop punk feeling and focusses more on dance pop, and there’s more auto-tune, and lame lyrics. Another example is A Thousand Suns by Linkin Park, that album was dissappointing bacause it doesn’t have those anxiety feelings like from their forst 2 albums Hybrid Theory and Meteora, and the album sounds like a rock opera discussing “the end of the world” and examples include songs such as “Waiting for the End” and “The Catalyst”. But even if Patrick was getting back with Fall Out Boy for new songs, I’m sure they’ll be good, no matter what fans would have to say, and I’m sure they’ll bring back the classic From Under the Cork Tree experience.

  • Tim8391

    I didn’t mean to post this photo of me. lol

  • Heii , I’m Ariane and I’m in 5th grade . I kinda got the same experience . 

    Fall Out Boy changed my life , too . 
    When I started listening to Fall Out Boy , my way of styling changed . In music , I used to listen to Pop music , but now , I only listen to Rock music . 
    I used to wear sleeveless and I dont wear any caps/hats , and now I always wear shirts (sometimes baggy and sometimes not) 
    Sometimes I always wear jackets even though its already freakin’ hot , and now I wear caps/hats and always buy one . 
    I used to be a stupid person about music , but now I kinda know almost everything bcuz of them :) 
    I’m desperate to buy their album but I can’t cuz I cant find any copy here in U.A.E 
    But I accept it cuz I have almost all of their songs in my phone . I never had a theme song but when I checked all of their songs I found many songs that fits my life 
    (my life is kinda complicated . My bestfriend hated me until now just because I ignored her . People annoying me in a bad way . I got a lot of friends but almost I’m not close with anyone and I will never believe again , but I got 2 true friends that never lets me down .) 
    My theme song for the moment is “Get Busy Living Or Get Busy Dying (Do Your Part To Save The Scene And Stop Going To Shows)” 
    Because sometimes I dont know if I need to get busy living with lies , troubles , and hurtful things to my feelings . Or get busy dying just to end all of this mess . 
    In case I die , I want to play “Thnks Fr Th Mmrs” because its the first song I ever heard from them and I get flashbacks on how awesome I think it was the first time I heard it 
    . . 
    Thats all I have to share . . There are many more :) But some are kinda personal and stuff
    LOVE YAH FALL OUT BOY !!!

    Please no haters :( 

  • Charli

    Everyone else has already commented with the same thing, but I just want to say that this made me so nostalgic. Fall Out Boy changed everything for me. Your last paragraph basically said it all. Thanks so much for writing this, and I beg Patrick to realize that there are fans out here who will love him until we die.

  • I can completely relate to this and did you know we go to the same school?

  • And you call yourself a real fan, huh.

  • It was a genuis record. I cant say I hate anything FOB has done, even their hiatus. I dont mind the wait. 
    FOB has certainly touched me as a person and I hope to see them live at least one time in my life now that I am able to go to a concert of theirs. 
    Your article was very nostalgia filled. I remember the first time I heard fall out boy on a barely working cd player from a friend of mine who was as desperate for music as I was. It was really  a very wonderful experience. 
    I remember the first cd I owned of them, my friend Brittany just straight up gave me “From under the cork tree” and “Infinity on high” along with a few patches and keychains from FOB. (She transitioned to Japanese only music and found FOB too difficult to understand, heh.) It was great, I was very happily entertained for months on end. Then 2008 hit and Folie a deux was out! My friend Manervia had a relative that worked at a CD shop and was able to get me a discount price on the cd and I am pretty happy to say that was the first and only cd I have ever purchased. Of course they did it again, what a terrific cd they strung together. 
    “Im not a crybaby, im THE crybaby” That was good times right there.

    Haha, I guess if FOB never comes back from hiatus all I could say is “Thanks for the memories” 

  • It was a genuis record. I cant say I hate anything FOB has done, even their hiatus. I dont mind the wait. 
    FOB has certainly touched me as a person and I hope to see them live at least one time in my life now that I am able to go to a concert of theirs. 
    Your article was very nostalgia filled. I remember the first time I heard fall out boy on a barely working cd player from a friend of mine who was as desperate for music as I was. It was really  a very wonderful experience. 
    I remember the first cd I owned of them, my friend Brittany just straight up gave me “From under the cork tree” and “Infinity on high” along with a few patches and keychains from FOB. (She transitioned to Japanese only music and found FOB too difficult to understand, heh.) It was great, I was very happily entertained for months on end. Then 2008 hit and Folie a deux was out! My friend Manervia had a relative that worked at a CD shop and was able to get me a discount price on the cd and I am pretty happy to say that was the first and only cd I have ever purchased. Of course they did it again, what a terrific cd they strung together. 
    “Im not a crybaby, im THE crybaby” That was good times right there.

    Haha, I guess if FOB never comes back from hiatus all I could say is “Thanks for the memories” 

  • It was a genuis record. I cant say I hate anything FOB has done, even their hiatus. I dont mind the wait. 
    FOB has certainly touched me as a person and I hope to see them live at least one time in my life now that I am able to go to a concert of theirs. 
    Your article was very nostalgia filled. I remember the first time I heard fall out boy on a barely working cd player from a friend of mine who was as desperate for music as I was. It was really  a very wonderful experience. 
    I remember the first cd I owned of them, my friend Brittany just straight up gave me “From under the cork tree” and “Infinity on high” along with a few patches and keychains from FOB. (She transitioned to Japanese only music and found FOB too difficult to understand, heh.) It was great, I was very happily entertained for months on end. Then 2008 hit and Folie a deux was out! My friend Manervia had a relative that worked at a CD shop and was able to get me a discount price on the cd and I am pretty happy to say that was the first and only cd I have ever purchased. Of course they did it again, what a terrific cd they strung together. 
    “Im not a crybaby, im THE crybaby” That was good times right there.

    Haha, I guess if FOB never comes back from hiatus all I could say is “Thanks for the memories” 

    Edit: I also dont know why its saying my surname is Maness, its Roberts.

  • It wasnt showing my comment at first.

  • Thanks so much for writing this. Made me remember when I first heard Fall Out Boy. I was getting ready to go to school when I was in 8th grade and I had MTV, on because they would play music video’s early in the morning, and I saw the music video for “Sugar, We’re Goin Down.” I’ll never forget how bizarre I thought it was and yet I fell in love. The story you have shared is nearly word for word of how that album made me feel and evolve as a music listener. Thank you. 

  • Everyone has their gate way band Mr. Tender. Green Day was and always will be my #1. Listen to what you love and to hell with the nay-sayers. 

  • That’s awesome. Thanks sos much for taking the time to read and comment!

  • Perfectly put. Between you and me, there are some rumors going around that a reunion may be closer than most think… 

  • This is exactly what Patrick was talking about in his essay.

  • Very well said. Thank you for commenting.

  • Sadasd

    DAAAMMMMMm awesome right up 1!! nuff said !

  • Captain EO

    The first time I heard Fall Out Boy I was already into my 30’s so neither “needed” their music as a form of escape or anything else quite so revelatory. I also wasn’t particularly a fan of the music that they often got herded into (emo, indie, punk, etc) – I simply thought it was great music with some killer melodies, clever lyrics sung by a guy with a fantastic voice. Then again I went on to adore Infinity on High & Folie a Deux so according the so-called music press I know nothing. That is where they are wrong however. I’ve been a huge Michael Jackson fan since a kid & until he tragically passed away, found myself arguing with those-who-know-best telling me that the only decent thing he did was some early Motown stuff, Off the Wall & Thriller. Now it’s a different story, the world realised his talent but too late to “save him” – back before 2009 to say you were an MJJ fan was to label yourself a freak, post-2009 it appears that actually, just about everyone was a massive Michael Jackson fan after all – hmmm. I guess what I’m saying is that it’s not about nostalgia to me, just like it was never about liking the flavour-of-the-month when they first hit it big, Fall Out Boy & Patrick Stump simply made some bloody brilliant music.

    One final thing however – they didn’t perform Coffee’s for Closer’s or 20 Dollar Nose Bleed at the gig to support the final album & I’m stilll not happy about it. I have unfinished business with Messrs Stump, Wentz, Trohman & Hurley …

  • Lenny64

    I started to listen to FOB when I was 10 ( I’m 11!) And liked it so bad that I wanted more, so I reaserched about them and I’m no asshole, I sure liked all their albums especially Infinity and found such songs like The (Shipped) Gold standard, Hum Hallelujah, The (After) Life of the Party, Sugar we’re goin down, All take this to you’re grave, Honorable Mention……So I would be incomplete if they didn’t reunite cuz’ in a world full of Pop and all that poop, You need FOB….. :) YOUNG FOB <3

  • A Fan

    Jacob,

    Spot on. Like so many others, your article captures perfectly how I feel as well. FOB is my guilty pleasure. Like you, I memorized every lyric and inflection. I still have 1 playlist that includes their entire catalog. It is by far the most listened-to on my iPod, although sadly it often as nostalgic as it is celebratory.

    I know you’ve read 8 million of these posts but here’s my two cents. I was always attracted to the entertainment value of the music, but what really hooked me, what really made me a fan for life, was the passion. It was often gritty and unrefined, but always honest and intense. I think that was what we relished about it. Growing up in suburbia, I think many of us longed for that raw emotion that we felt, but were unable to always express. I’m sure everyone hears it in different places but I can feel it in the intensity in Patrick’s voice in songs like XO, Dance, Dance, Pros and Cons of Breathing, Grenade Jumper, and My Heart is The Worst Kind of Weapon. It comes through in the rawness of the lyrics and the energy in the way the instruments are played. To me, that is the essence of FOB. These guys are not singing about being the best at everything or about how many girls they’ve slept with or how much they like to drink and party. They sing about the things that they experience day in and day out and the emotional fabric of that experience. I appreciate the musical value of their albums but it’s the passion, the energy, and the emotion that makes fans like us listen to a cd so often that is has to be replaced due to wear.

    Unfortunately, I think these qualities have also doomed FOB. It is convenient when an artist’s heartfelt work happens to also be financially successful, but most great artists, as Patrick notes, only receive posthumous acclaim. To those of us who enjoy FOB for what it really is, we must always remember that there will always be troglodytes out there who bought their CDs only because they appeared to be rebellious. When they became successful and were viewed as “sell outs”, those people ran. We, who realized their value was unrelated to their “in-ness” or “out-ness”, have stayed loyal to what never really changed: their ability to fill their songs with our emotions. They said as much when they said “I could write it better than you ever felt it.”

    For my part, I feel privileged. Maybe another band of their quality will never touch me like this again, but at least I always have Fall Out Boy. As Tennyson tells us “’tis better to have loved and lost than never to have loved at all.” Should you ever speak to Patrick, Pete, Joe, or Andy, please tell them they are beloved and to keep touching souls in whatever they do. It is a rare gift.

    Again, great job on the article. Keep up the good work.

  • Haj

    I can relate to most of this article as i was brought up in a different culture to the one i was living in, a British Muslim with Pakistani traditions, well this is what my parents believed. I was 14 at the time when Fall Out Boy first caught my attention on a radio channel, ever since then i could not help but listen to them, even now, i listen to them and i am now 20. To me their music is calming and i feel i can still relate to their music. They are also the reason i started listening to heavier music and really got into rock music.”Without Fall Out Boy’s influence in middle school, I would have never taken that leap into alternative music”

  • delilah

     i don’t know you, but based off of this post, i’m pretty damn sure that if we spent five minutes alone together, I’m pretty damn sure we’d become best friends.  You post is EXACTLY how I feel.  It’s good to see someone not dissing them because they’re taking a break or came out with an album not under the name Fall Out Boy

  • Aaron

    The thing I took the most 4rm this was finding ur first band/album and how that influences ur life. I found my first band/album in the 6th grade and it was “Still Not Getting Any…” by Simple Plan. I feel like a large portion of who I am 2day has been affected by this.

  • Guest

    The one thing I hate. Honestly.
    Pros like Fall Out Boy (Huge fan here) lack recognition, while other nutcases who can’t sing or write music for nuts (no names here) literally mint money and are poster boys for nearly everything…

  • Lexusr64

    OK, um yeah Fall Out Boy is life changing, but for me not so much the best kinda change. I’m literally obsessed with them. And last night i had a dream that Pete Wentz was my cousin and me and Patrick were best friends. I love them both to death. I’m only 13. So, I pray to Andy (God/drummer of FOB) that I will get over them. I don’t want to completely forget about them, but I don’t wanna be stuck on will I or will I not ever see a Fall Out Boy in concert, or will I or will I not ever meet Patrick Stump. Those kinda things drive you crazy if you think about them all the time. And it’s not even really FOB anymore it’s Patrick Stump. In my opinion he is the best singer on earth. And I love, or at least I’m in love with what I think and hope he’ll be like, but like his song porcelain I have weird feeling he’s not gonna be what i’m expecting. And another thing is I don’t know him I shouldn’t expect anything from him. Urg i’m so confused. 

  • Lexusr64

    Your awesome! I’m only 13 and when they got together I was like anywhere from 2-4 depends what year you think they got together, but by time I was old enough to appreciate good music, and understand lyrics they were already on “hiatus”. And I just don’t think they’ll get back together because my luck sucks. And I love them all so much and even there solo projects are amazing, but it would make a soon to be 14 year old the most happy kid on earth to have them play in Iowa near Iowa City. Liek I said I just don’t think that’ll happen…

  • Shaniixskeleton

    That’s the same album that changed me when I was in grade 9.

  • Shaniixskeleton

    At 13 I was in america (I’m from a small country town in Australia) And One of my mothers older friends asked me about a band called Fall Out Boy, It that point in time I just nodded and said sure, Even though i had never heard of such a band, Honestly in my town we never listened to anything besides big named country music. So on that trip FOB happened to be doing an all aged gig and I somehow got dragged along to something with a couple handfuls of uni kids.
    I fell in love. I had no idea what they were singing or who they were, But when I got back to my Hotel I went to Best Buys and bought all there released Albums and took them back to OZ with me, But 15 I knew Every word to every song they released, became the ‘outcast’ at my school and started to introduce other country kids to what i considered Amazing music.
    I moved from that town to a smallish (I guess) city. 
    And that same year (Still 15) Fall out boy inspired me to join the music industry. So School was put on the back burners and I joined a radio station, HUng out in recording studios and took frequent trips to America with my Mum just to buy (Almost non existent) Music and see what was happened in the punk scene.
    I’m 20 now. 
    Fall out Boy to this day it still the greatest thing to happen to me.
    I’m a bartender but I have a Small band I play in, I still work in Radio.
    ANd a week ago and Started my Certificate 3 and 4 in Music Business.
    When It’s done, I’m coming back to the state (Which I consider home) and going to set up a Artist Label/Recording Studio. All because of FOB.
    I was never an obsessive fan, If you ask me something about their private lives I wouldn’t know the answer, But it is honestly the only band that i have gone out of my way to learn full names for. I work Pete’s Clandestine Necklace for 5 years before it broke, I bought it in 2007. 

  • Now, Patrick stopped making *LEGENDARY* music. He stopped being a solo artist.  One of the reasons is this blog of yours.
    And the ‘Haters’ that bought tickets to his tours to boo him. UNBELIEVABLE…
    Also those FOB fans that always compare Patrick to Pete. WHY NOT GET A LIFE?
    And the most heartbreaking reason are the assho*** who told him that he is nothing without FOB. :((
    Read this for better explanations. 
    http://www.patrickstump.com/post/18474641989/we-liked-you-better-fat-confessions-of-a-pariah 

  • this is exactly how it was for me, one of my friends gave me that same album in middle school and I definitely would not have liked or maybe even known about my favorite bands today had it not been for that one album. I love this article so much and I am soooo glad that you wrote this and that I had the privelege to read it!!! :) you are amazing and Fall Out Boy rocks!!! <3

  • Sforzanewyork

    I can relate to this story in so many ways.

  • Kevin Powell

    I started listening to FOB when my older brothers started to. i didnt really get into them until i was about 12 or 13 though. i was obsessed with them. i would listen to them when ever i could and when ever i couldnt. Eventually i started listening to Panic at the disco and My chemical romance and fell from my FOB status. Last Christmas i got and ipod nano and found out that FOB had released a greatist hits album so i bought it remembering the good times i had listenign to those songs that made me enjoy myself more. then i started wanting more from them. i started buying all their albums. then i found out that Patrick Stump had released a solo album. I LOVED IT!!! i had never liked any kind of hip-hop music like that but for some reason i couldnt get enough of it. NOw that he isnt doing anything anymore because of people that thought he was better in FOB, i feel there is something i should do to help him but since i live in the plaains of Northeast Colorado i cant do anything but post comments that (i hope) encourage Mr. Stump to keep going.

    My favorite thing about Soul Punk is that when ever i feel down i plug in my hadphones and i feel better and can keep my upbeat attitude. I wish more people would feel the same about his album but i cant change the worlds opinions. I advise anyone that reads this to atleast listen to Spotlight by Patrick Stump.

  • Kira

    Hi, you two are both absolutely brilliant and I know that the 3 of us would be the very best of friends, as Fall Out Boy are, too, the reason I am still alive. I hate how people seem to have a problem with where the band members are now. I’ll support all of them, no matter what happens, and I will forever be a Beliver. (If you read that as Belieber then I hate you) I promise you this, as soon as Fall Out Boy go on tour, I will see you all there. And I will be there waiting from the beginning and I’ll be the girl at the front crying when they play the song that saved her life.

  • CurbsideAudio

    Thank you so much for reading!

  • Thank you for reading, Nicole. Patrick has not stopped creating music. He is simply working with others for the time being. Everyone needs a break.

  • Thank you so much for reading! I appreciate it and your response!

  • I rememeber hearing  Thnks fr th mmrs on the radio when i was younger and not knowing who the band was, like 3-4 years later i found it on my brothers Ipod and my love of Fall Out Boy began. I watched as many of there video’s on youtube as i could, till i finally got round to buying Believers Never Die. I was so excited at finding this all to familiar yet, brand new band. I went to search for tour dates to find they had broken up. I almost cried. Yet i’m still happy because there are plenty of albums i havent bought or listened to meaning many more songs and happy memories of them. Thanks Fall Out Boy :)

  • Bob Theunicorn

     i also love patrick stumps solo albums and i also do truly enjoy listening to P!ATD and MCR and i can really relate to you because i also support Mr.Stumps work and unfortunately can’t do anything  but post comments. Sadly i found out about fall out boy to late before i could truly enjoy their fame. I also like you am mad because Patrick won’t release anything because of the haters bullying Patrick of his decision. 

  • TheGirlWhoLived

    Me, being the little girl I am, I’ve never been able to appreciate their fame. By the time I became an active listener, they’d already been on hiatus. All I can say is Fall Out Boy is so damn rad, Patrick’s got great pipes, and Pete’s lyrics have corrupted my used-to-be-innocent mind. I wish I had been born earlier, so I could be the one outside music stores waiting to buy the newest FOB album, the one who camped outside venues. Soul Punk is definitely different from everything else I’ve heard from Mr. Stump, yet equally amazing. So, here’s one more fan of yours.  

  • Oh god. He could not have said it better. FUCT was the 2nd CD i ever bought (waaaaay back when I was in the 3rd grade) and it literally changed my life. I remember staying up, listening to the whole entire CD and trying to memorize all the lyrics one more time before I went to bed, every single day. FOB’s always been there for me; I actually broke down in tears when I heard about their hiatus. It’s sad to see them go.

  • Kimi Alex

    The first time I heard Fallout Boy, I was about 6 in 2001. I don’t even remember, but it was “Dead on Arrival” and from that moment, I knew that they would never disappoint me. Fallout Boy was 10 years of my life, and while people always said i was too young to be listening to such lyrics, I knew all of them.. It’s memories like correcting people who sing ‘Sugar We’re Going Down” wrong and then having a good laugh because they couldn’t actually tell me what they were saying (wegooidawdawinanoooeeeoooaw) or sitting in my moms old car listening to whatever top 40 station she picked and belting “MEEE AAAND YOU, SETTING IN A HONEY MOOON!” that remind me of how much music brings us together, and Fallout Boy was probably the first band that I actually could relate to.. Even at 6 years old.

  • Barbara De Maio

    I’m from Argentina and It’s nice to know there is people all around the world that treasure this incredible album in their hearts.

    The first time I knew about Fall Out Boy, I was 16 and I saw the ”Sugar we are going down” video on one of those special tv show nights for brand new bands on mtv (when Mtv was still a music channel) and I just felt in love with the song. I stated to investigate more about this band that was blowing my mind. I got into forums and chat romms from fans in north America,The album was imposible to find here so I asked a friend who was living in Mexico to deliver me a copy of the From Under The Cork Tree album. I was totally inlove.

    While I was reading this post I sprang not only an infinite nostalgia and desire to turn the clock back, also an infinity inspiration.

    Thank you for sharing your story, makes me think I’m not alone.

  • Mariuxi Franco

    I think I am a little in love with you with this articule